10 Roman Sites to Visit with Kids across North East England

 

to Visit with Kids across North East England

The North East is home to many Roman sites and places of interest and visitors travel here from across the world to visit. We are spoilt for choice and very lucky to have these on our doorstep. 

Over the years we have visited these attractions and the kids have learned so much about Roman History through experience which I am grateful for. 

Why not set yourself the challenge of visiting all of these attractions over the next few years? 

Prices and information correct as of February 2021. Please check details and opening hours before setting off and follow current travel advice and Government restrictions. 



Segedunum, North Tyneside


Segedunum is a Roman fort and museum in Wallsend. At Segedunum you can explore the excavated remains of the Roman fort. In the museum you can see recovered items from the time of the Ancient Romans with hands-on play ideas for children including Roman dress up and popular craft activities during the school holidays (on Mondays). Within the museum they also have ideas for roman themed activities to do at home such as making a Roman Shield which can be found on their site.

Visitors over 16 years old pay £3.95 and all children under the age of 16 have free admission. The museum has its own car park next to the museum entrance, parking is free. The nearest metro station is Wallsend on Station Road which is just across the road (as is the bus station).

There is a gift shop, cafe and viewing tower with fantastic views over the ruins and River Tyne and you will find a small play area and gardens outside. You can find out more including accessibility information over on their website.


Corbridge Roman Town, Northumberland 



At Corbridge Roman Town you can uncover the history of the town that was once at the crossroads of two major Roman thoroughfares.

Over the course of 350 years it developed from a strategic military fort into a bustling cosmopolitan town. Today it houses one of the most important roman collections in Britain and many objects offer an insight into life in a Roman town. At the museum you can view The Corbridge Hoard, which is an almost 2000 year old Roman time capsule which contained preserved objects such as a soldiers armour and tools.

Kids could explore the remains of the ancient Roman town and learn about how people lived in Roman Britain. Free parking is provided for approximately 20 cars.  The site is 1/2 a mile north-west of Corbridge. There is braille signage and guides ad guide dogs are welcome.

Entry is FREE if you are an English Heritage member or there is a small charge for non-members. You can find out more on their website.


Housesteads, Northumberland


Housesteads is a Roman fort located on Hadrian's wall. You can explore the ruins of the ancient fort and enjoy some of the best views of Hadrian's wall.

The museum and Roman collection has many artifacts that give you an insight into Roman Life. In the museum you can dress-up as a Roman soldier as well as have a family picnic at the site. In school holidays, the site often runs family activities including Roman Soldier school. 

Entry is free for English Heritage members or chargeable for non-members. On-site parking is chargeable and the museum is accessible via the AD122 bus. You can find out more, including accessibility information on their website.


Vindolanda, Northumberland 


Vindolanda is a fort just south of Hadrian's wall.  The fort was demolished and rebuilt nine times. The museum at the site changes its artefacts annually as a result of their excavation programme so there is always something new to see.

Vindolanda has a cafe that serves hot and cold drinks as well as snacks, lunches and afternoon tea. You can explore the ancient ruins of the fort and Hadrian's wall and watch excavation in action.

For the Vindolanda standard adult tickets cost £8.30, student/seniors are £7.80 and children are £4.75 as well as a family ticket for 2 adults and 3 children which costs £.23.75. Vindolanda has car parking on site and is accessible via the AD122 bus.

You can find out more, including information regarding accessibility on their website.


Temple of Mithras, Northumberland 


The temple of Mithras was built by the soldiers of Carrawburgh. Mithraism was a Roman religion inspired by a god originally worshiped in the eastern empire.

The site is reached through a field, parts of which are uneven and can become muddy, because of this it is not suitable for wheelchairs or buggies. The site is also prone to flooding in wet weather. There is a chargeable car park on site but be aware of surrounding livestock. Entry is FREE. 

Find out more on their website.


Roman Army Museum, Northumberland


This museum includes three galleries which tell the story of the Roman soldier with lots of hands on activities and exhibitions. The galleries contain objects from vindolanda collection and full scale replicas.

 The museum also contains a remake of a roman classroom where you can interact with the roman teacher velius longus who will appear via a hologram.

The museum allows you to take a look into the past and discover what life was like as a Roman.

Entry fees apply. The museum has a car park and is accessible via the AD122 bus. If you would like to find out more, including accessibility information, visit their website.


Binchester Roman Fort, County Durham



Binchester was founded around 80 AD and for a time was one of the largest Roman military installations in Northern Britain we know from inscriptions that.

The fort was used until the end of the Roman period and was accompanied by a large settlement around it. People continued to live in the fort for several centuries after Britain left the Roman empire.

For admission, adults cost £5, concessions £4 and children are £3 whilst under 4s can go free. The light has specially laid out with level access for people in wheelchairs and those with prams.

Find out more about visiting on their website.


Chesters Roman Fort, Northumberland


You can explore the ruins of this fort and view the river near the fort and bathhouse. The fort is home to a bathhouse where roman soldiers could relax on Hadrian's wall.

There is trail sheet for kids where the emperor has ordered them to run the fort and you can see livestock in the surrounding fields.

This fort allows you to take a stroll through history by visiting the bathhouse and the cavalry fort and you can visit the onsite museum.

If you are an English Heritage member,  then entry is free, if not then adults cost £9, children (5-17) cost £5.40, concessions cost £8.10 and family (2 adults up to 3 children) costs £23.40 whilst Family (1 adult and up to 3 children) costs £13.40.

There is a car park on-site and Chesters Roman Fort is accessible via the AD122 bus. 

You can find out more, including accessibility information on their website.


Great North Museum, Newcastle Upon Tyne 


The Great North Museum contains many artifacts from the past and whilst it is closed they have a 3d tour that you can take so that you can still see their artifacts during lockdown.

They have many galleries such as the Hadrian's wall gallery which enables visitors to discover the detailed history of the site as well as information on all of the forts and a replica model of the wall.

Entry is FREE and the museum is easy to access via public transport with Haymarket Metro and Bus Station being a short stroll away.

To find out more, including accessibility information, visit their website.

Arbeia Roman Fort, South Tyneside 



Standing above the entrance to the River Tyne, this fort guarded the main sea route to Hadrian's wall. It was a key military point to other forts along the wall.

The fort was a key supply point for the Romans and it was home to 600 Roman troops and it is said to be the birthplace of Northumbrian King Oswin. Step into the fort and immerse yourself into the world of the Romans. Arbeia is free to visit and often hosts special Roman-themed markets and events. 

You can find out more by visiting, including accessibility information their website.

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to Visit with Kids across North East England




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